Splice is the transformation of media in Asia.

We deliver the intelligence behind the transformation of media. We believe that the business models of traditional media are broken, and we want to help build an ecosystem that develops new ones.

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“We want to see the development of a healthy media ecosystem in Asia. The industry would benefit greatly from Splice’s reporting and coverage of best practices in this space.”

—Gary Liu, CEO, South China Morning Post

From this week

Platforms

Facebook’s paralysis and negligence in tackling hate speech keep coming up in conversations.

Reuters — which has two of its journalists in prison in Myanmar for reporting on the country’s genocide — put out a special report on Facebook’s hate speech problem in the country. Facebook doesn’t have an employee in this country. Speech moderation is outsourced to Accenture in Kuala Lumpur in a secretive project called “Honey Badger”. But it’s not clear how many Burmese speakers are on the job. People working on the project sign a one-year renewable contract, and agree to never divulge that Facebook is the client. This is what Reuters found out about the project.
Reuters

Facebook’s head of news partnerships Campbell Brown made some off-the-record comments to Australian media executives about traffic referrals that stirred the hornet’s nest.

The Australian, breaking professional protocol in publishing details of that session, quoted her as allegedly saying, “We are not interested in talking to you about your traffic and referrals any more. That is the old world and there is no going back”. Of course, this isn’t new to many publishers who’ve seen their referrals dwindle in the past year. But it’s another reminder to everyone: Facebook is in the business of Facebook. If you’re in publishing and you’re still counting on Facebook’s referral traffic to keep your traffic numbers up, you’re delusional.
Nieman Lab

Transformations

Design

How do you redesign The Wall Street Journal’s 126 newsletters?

1. You cull them by a third. 2. You nudge your readers to subscribe with a prompt. 3. You update market info — in real time. 4. You let people hit reply. People like that whole responding thing. 5. Test readers’ resistance to your paywall. 6. You test a new email platform that plays to your strengths. 7. You add whimsy. At the end of it all, a newsletter is a conversation, and it takes more than machine learning to keep that going. All aboard for whimsy, I say.
Nieman Lab

The product design process can be notoriously difficult.

This is mostly because it’s often seen as an artistic moment of genius broken down into deliverables to a client waiting for results in a process with unstructured feedback. This is also known as herding cats. But we tend to forget that most effective product design works to fix a business problem in a collaborative manner that establishes goals, relies on prototyping, user feedback, and testing. How this product designer explores and tests his own journey is a lesson in process and how we work with it.
UX Design

Notables

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